General Dermatology

I treat both adults and children in my practice. The most common conditions I diagnose and treat include:

Acne

Acne, or acne vulgaris, is a skin problem that starts when oil and dead skin cells clog up your pores. Some people call it blackheads, blemishes, whiteheads, pimples, or zits. When you have just a few red spots, or pimples, you have a mild form of acne. Severe acne can mean hundreds of pimples that can cover the face, neck, chest, and back or it can be bigger, solid, red lumps that are painful (cysts).

Alopecia (hair loss)

Alopecia areata is a type of hair loss that occurs when your immune system mistakenly attacks hair follicles, which is where hair growth begins. The damage to the follicle is usually not permanent. Experts do not know why the immune system attacks the follicles. Alopecia areata is most common in people younger than 20, but children and adults of any age may be affected. Women and men are affected equally.

Dandruff

Dandruff is a common chronic scalp condition marked by flaking of the skin on your scalp. Dandruff isn’t contagious or serious but it can be embarrassing and sometimes difficult to treat.

Eczema

Eczema is a term for a group of medical conditions that cause the skin to become inflamed or irritated. The most common type of eczema is known as atopic dermatitis, or atopic eczema. Atopic refers to a group of diseases with an often-inherited tendency to develop other allergic conditions, such as asthma and hay fever.

Hives

Urticaria, also known as hives, is an outbreak of swollen, pale red bumps or plaques (wheals) on the skin that appear suddenly — either because of the body’s reaction to certain allergens or for unknown reasons.

Mole checks

When it comes to your health and skin cancer, it’s a good idea to be proactive and keep an eye out for dangerous moles. Moles can be linked to skin cancer. This is especially true if you have a family history of skin cancer linked to moles.

Molluscum

Molluscum contagiosum is a skin infection that causes small pearly or flesh-colored bumps. The bumps may be clear and the center often is indented. The infection is caused by a virus. The virus is easily spread but is not harmful.

Nail disorders

A nail disease or onychosis is a disease or deformity of the nail. Although the nail is a structure produced by the skin and is a skin appendage, nail diseases have a distinct classification as they have their own signs and symptoms which may relate to other medical conditions. Some nail conditions that show signs of infection or inflammation may require medical assistance.

Pityriasis rosea

Pityriasis rosea (pih-tih-RY-uh-sus ROH-zee-uh) is a common skin problem that causes a rash. Although it can occur at any age, it is seen most often in those between the ages of 10 and 35. Pityriasis rosea is usually harmless.

Psoriasis

Unpredictable and irritating, psoriasis is one of the most baffling and persistent of skin disorders. It’s characterized by skin cells that multiply up to 10 times faster than normal. As underlying cells reach the skin’s surface and die, their sheer volume causes raised, red plaques covered with white scales. Psoriasis typically occurs on the knees, elbows, and scalp, and it can also affect the torso, palms, and soles of the feet.

Rashes

A rash indicates an abnormal change in skin color or texture. Rashes are usually caused by skin inflammation, which can have many causes. There are many types of rashes, including eczema, granuloma annulare, lichen planus, and pityriasis rosea.

Rosacea

Rosacea is a long-term skin condition that typically affects the face. It results in redness, pimples, swelling, and small and superficial dilated blood vessels. Often the nose, cheeks, and forehead, and chin are most involved. A red enlarged nose may occur in severe disease, a condition known as rhinophyma.

Ringworm

Ringworm isn’t a worm. It’s a skin infection that’s caused by moldlike fungi that live on the dead tissues of your skin, hair, and nails. You can get it in any of these places — and on your scalp.

Skin cancer

Skin cancers include melanoma, basal cell, and squamous cell. Basal and squamous cell are common and treatment is very effective. Malignant melanoma can be difficult to treat. Early diagnosis and treatment can increase the survival rate from melanoma.

Skin discoloration

Discolored skin patches are irregular areas where there are changes in skin color. They are a common problem with a wide array of potential causes. Some of the more common causes for changes in skin color are illness, injury, and inflammatory problems. Discolored skin patches also commonly develop in a certain part of the body due to a difference in melanin levels. Melanin is the substance that provides color to the skin and protects it from the sun. When there is an overproduction of melanin in a given area, it can result in skin discoloration in that area.

Skin of color

Patients with skin of color have unique skin care needs often requiring novel and individualized treatments. There has been a recent boost in the attention, research and development of new clinical practices for dermatology conditions in patients with skin of color. It is well known that certain skin types are more responsive to some treatments than others.

Vitiligo

Vitiligo (vit-ih-LIE-go) is a disease that causes the loss of skin color in blotches. The extent and rate of color loss from vitiligo is unpredictable. It can affect the skin on any part of your body. It may also affect hair and the inside of the mouth.

Warts

Warts are benign (noncancerous) skin growths that appear when a virus infects the top layer of the skin. Viruses that cause warts are called human papillomavirus (HPV). You are more likely to get one of these viruses if you cut or damage your skin in some way. Wart viruses are contagious. Warts can spread by contact with the wart or something that touched the wart. Warts are often skin-colored and feel rough, but they can be dark (brown or gray-black), flat, and smooth.